How Career Training Schools Can Boost Your Employability [Guide]

  Posted on July 25, 2016

  Written by Morgan O'Rourke

Hands-on career training boosts employability College graduates have one goal in mind upon graduation: Land a rewarding, in-demand job in their field of expertise.

Did you know that approximately 952,000 associate degrees and 1.8 million bachelor’s degrees were awarded to graduating college students in the 2015-2016 academic year?1  

And these numbers are only expected to grow.

There’s no denying that the job market is crowded and highly competitive, and when it comes to landing a job, it’s vital you have the education that will make you career-ready and a valuable asset to employers.

Did you know that 84% of employers believe that today’s college graduate is not prepared for workplace responsibilities and challenges?2

Whether you’re a recent high school graduate or a professional looking to change career paths and gain experience fast, an advanced, hands-on education from a top career training school can boost your employability and propel you into the business, healthcare, IT, or administrative fields in high-demand.

Explore this interactive guide to your field of interest and discover:

  • What employers are looking for in their new hires and employees
  • Five ways a hands-on career training education can boost your employability
  • How you can start your career faster with real-world experience

We already know you have what it takes to succeed in today’s fast-paced, competitive workforce. Now it’s time to set yourself apart from the masses and boost your employability with accelerated training in your specific career field.

Discover a robust, interactive education that you can apply directly to your career path.


1 National Center for Education Statistics. “Degrees conferred by postsecondary institutions, by level of degree and sex of student: Selected years, 1869-70 through 2024-25.” Accessed June 5, 2016.

2 LiveCareer. “Hands-On Training Can Help College Students Get Hired.” Accessed June 6, 2016.